Skip to content

Posts

Featured Post

Pictures Without Words – VOL 001, ISS 002

As much intersubjective agreement as possible. Pictures Without Words Volume 001, Issue 002 includes work by Saleem Ahmed, Chris Bentley, Elise Boularan, Leslie Burns, Amanda L. Driggers, Matt Evans, Gretchen Grace, Amanda Greene, Emil Handke, Julie Renee Jones, Tammy Mercure, Lindsay McCarty, Michaela O’Brien, John O’Connor, Miles Price, Matthew Shain, Kurt Simonson, Nabil Tazi, Matt Williams, Sara J. Winston, and Tara Wray.

Continue reading Pictures Without Words – VOL 001, ISS 002

Gravity Is Stronger Here by Phyllis B. Dooney and Jardine Libaire

Other than poverty, what exactly the cigarettes (and alcohol and drugs) throughout Gravity Is Stronger Here help Dooney’s subject matter escape isn’t fully on display in the photographs alone. Not that poverty is not oppressive enough. Not that it doesn’t promote a feeling of ineptitude. The Browns appear to be stuck and at times seem to not know what to do with their situation any more than what to do in front of the camera. At times they feel very aware of the camera’s presence, mugging unnaturally through their drugs, God, boredom, and a whole lot of doing nothing. But in text and visual clues one learns that the Browns have internal and external struggles. They deal with difficult situations with great self-awareness and honesty. Accompanied by Libaire’s poems the sometimes overly dramatic feels sincere.

Continue reading Gravity Is Stronger Here by Phyllis B. Dooney and Jardine Libaire

Wipe Your Nose Sugar Boy by Mark Albain

If Wipe Your Nose Sugar Boy is situated within Southern Gothic themes, Albain wastes no time getting directly to one of its most central themes—religion. […] Vanity plates and discarded signs indicate that Wipe Your Nose Sugar Boy is set at least in part, in Tennessee. A dead bird, tattered things covered in tarps, and overgrown fauna that follow suggest that in Albain’s South, the gospel is less about prosperity and more about the realism of muted gray tones.

Continue reading Wipe Your Nose Sugar Boy by Mark Albain