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Married to America by Justin Clifford Rhody

These point and shoot snapshots that make up Married to America by Justin Clifford Rhody are unconcerned with American beauty, picturesque plateaus, the fog of golden hour, or road trip tropes. This marriage is more like beige linoleum, a toilet painted black and chipping, or a tin bust of our first American father. More like honesty than infatuation. More like fancy-up what we’ve got—ketchup on scrambled eggs.

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Land of Smiles by Chris Mottalini

Despite the photographs presenting so little information, cumulatively Land of Smiles feels so deliberate. If the images withhold, if the text and title mislead, it feels like the intent of Mottalini to do so. Even the texture of the paper and the uncut pages carry great but open meaning—paired with images that read like one sees with pupils dilated—they all coalesce in Land of Smiles. Not often is so little so satisfying. The difficulty is the reveal and the pleasure is not fully knowing.

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Where You Come From is Gone by Jared Ragland and Cary Norton

Remembrance is just as prevalent in Birmingham-based fine art photographers Jared Ragland and Cary Norton’s collaborative project GUSDUGGER—of which the series Where You Come From Is Gone is included—as it was integral to the 2016 political campaign slogan: Make America Great Again, but the two could perhaps not be further divided. If MAGA remembers a time we as Americans are to reclaim, then Where You Come From Is Gone remembers what we took and the places deconstructed to make this country what it is today.

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A Brief Interview with Noelle McCleaf

“Before Hurricane Irma, I spent a week frantically throwing all of my belongings into plastic bags. […] I came to the obvious realization that most of us, myself included, have an unhealthy addiction to things. Trying to move and protect all of my belongings exhausted me so thoroughly that I simply left some things unwrapped. […] If I’ve learned anything from my subjects, it’s that we humans have a long way to go if we want to continue living on this planet, and we only have to look back a hundred years to understand that we are very capable of living without many of the things we think we ‘need'[.]”

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all that cannot be said by Colin Stearns

Photographs of burnt out car shells made in detail like insurance claims appear approximately one-third of the way into Colin Stearns’ all that cannot be said. Everything prior—brick walls, a wedding dress and tux on window display, wrought iron fences, flowers left as memorial tied to telephone poles, missing persons signs—read like a long prologue to the charred remains. 

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